Gabriel Tenorio round core strings fitting notes
Due to the design differences and handmade nature of Gabriel Tenorio strings, if you are new to using them there are sometimes a few concerns prior to fitting. I now always provide a brief fitting notes summery in your parcel with every set, and of course I'm always here to help with any questions you have. But don't worry, hopefully this blog article will help when the time comes to try them out! It may also help continued users of Gts.co strings too, so I'll leave this article live on the blog for future reference too.

Gabriel Tenorio Strings UK - Fitting guide

First up, Setting up!
There are some differences in overall tensions when compared to factory made hex core strings. For this reason, it's recommend to observe the guitar's set-up when fitting as it may require a tweak due to tensions. This is normal, so even if you usually use hex core 10 gauge strings and switch to Gabriel's 10 gauge, it's worth checking your neck relief etc after they're fitted and settled. For the most part though, many knowledgeable players check overall set-up upon fitting a fresh set of strings anyway, particularly when swapping brands or gauges, so this might be a normal course of action for you. If it isn't though, and set-ups, neck reliefs or intonation is a bit of a blur for you, don't worry, get in touch with a trusted local guitar tech and let an expert help. Plus supporting local businesses is a nice way to go about doing so too! I have developed a small list of guitar techs I would recommend around the country, so if you don't know one in your area, feel free to get in touch and I'll see if you are local to any of them I respect for great work! I do also carry out set-ups here and have many years of experience with Gabriel Tenorio strings, I'm based in Stourbridge, West Midlands so if that's close to you, I'd love to help!

gabriel Tenorio strings UK

Stringing up!
The first thing you might notice as you feed the new wrapped string through the bridge and up towards the tuner, is the length of the string itself and the 'wrap'. If you're used to using factory made hex core strings which a large percentage of us are, then Gabriel's strings may initially look a bit short in comparison. Don't worry, this is all how they should be and is an aspect of their design. Gabriel's strings are made to suit the scale lengths of a guitar a bit better, so the overall string length isn't crazy long with lots of waste, but perhaps most noticeable and an initial point of concern for players not used to these strings is the length of the wrap on the wound strings. They have been specifically designed this way, and the exposed core tail is to be applied to the tuning post as normal. The wrap doesn't need to reach the post, the central core is perfectly fine for gripping the tuner. One reason for this is to help take any worry away when cutting the string length on vintage style tuners..
For vintage style tuners, like those found on 50s/60s style Fenders for example where the string end pushes down into the post, simply measure three posts past the one you are stringing, and trim the string length. But not having to cut the wrapped part of the string, only the central core, takes any worry away about trimming round core strings. Nice and easy!

For the best results on other styles of tuners, traditional pull-through tuner holes for example, simply string and tune up as normal then trim afterwards. 
Ideally you want 3 complete turns on the tuning post when stringing up.

For locking tuners, they are primarily designed for use with hex core strings, but can be set-up with round core strings too. Try to get at least one full turn of the string tail on the tuning post.

Many players report an incredibly long lifespan on Gabriel Tenorio strings, this isn't due to any coating etc. It's simply down to the design of round core strings, no gap for finger grease and dirt to build up between the wrap and core. Of course all skin types are a little different when it comes to string life, so Gabriel recommends a wipe down after use and to keep your hands clean as best you can!

I hope this helps and you enjoy the great playing feel, and tone of round core strings!

James

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